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Trees for Screening and Privacy

Create a natural screen for privacy or to shelter from a prevailing wind or other natural elements.

We grow trees for screening and privacy whether you want to conceal an unsightly view, create additional privacy in your garden, or screen off a section of your property. Trees for screening and privacy can be used in interesting ways in your garden or property. A fence may act as a boundary but if you have overlooking buildings or windows the fence alone may not offer you the screening you would like.

A stilted hedge uses trees that have been specifically produced with this purpose in mind. These trees will have a clear stem to reach up to fence panel height of around 1.8-2m and then a crown forming above this height. Generally, evergreens are preferred for this purpose and can be planted densely to achieve maximum effect from the offset. Laurus nobilis (Bay Laurel) is a great choice in this situation. Stilted screening using pleached or box head trees is another option and a great way to add interest to your garden, using trees to offer extra privacy without compromising on the design. Typically, pleached trees will have a 1.8-2m clear stem and a 2m x 2m flat panel on top to be used for aerial screening above a fence/wall.

Strategically placed evergreens can be a good way to use trees to screen unsightly views or block sightlines and can be positioned as desired to achieve the level of cover required. Quercus Ilex (Holm Oak), is a densely foliaged evergreen tree that gives very good coverage as it matures.

Hedging is also an important component of any screening choice in a garden bringing strength and structure to the design while also providing for privacy planting.

Feathered trees are another great option for screening if space is not a constraint. Trees which are considered feathered will usually have an upright central leading shoot and a stem furnished with evenly spaced and balanced lateral growths down to near ground level according to species.

Feel free to browse through our stock, we are always happy to talk about our trees. Visits to the nursery are welcome by appointment and are a great way to experience our trees for yourself.


  • "Acer campestre Elsrijk is a cultivar of the Field Maple and is named after the park in Amstelveen, Holland where it was discovered in the 1950s. It differs from the species in that it has a more regular, oval habit. At Maturity one could mistake it for straight forward Acer campestre but one with a lovely compact shape. Acer campestre Elsrijk does best in rich, well drained soils, but does well in virtually any soil type, and will readily tolerate drought, soil compaction and air pollution. A medium sized tree which we particularly recommend for urban and street planting, its foliage turns a magnificent clear yellow in autumn."
  • "Acer campestre Elsrijk Pleached is a cultivar of the Field Maple and is named after the park in Amstelveen, Holland where it was discovered in the 1950s. It differs from the species in that it has a more regular, oval habit. Pleched. At Maturity one could mistake it for straight forward Acer campestre but one with a lovely compact shape. Acer campestre Elsrijk does best in rich, well drained soils, but does well in virtually any soil type, and will readily tolerate drought, soil compaction and air pollution. A medium sized tree which we particularly recommend for urban and street planting, its foliage turns a magnificent clear yellow in autumn."
  • "Acer campestre Red Shine is a stunning cultivar that has all of the qualities of its parent, Acer campestre. This cultivar has the significant benefit of producing new growth which is bright crimson, before turning to a deep green as the growing season progresses. This tree is unique in the fact that there are few other trees which offer this extent of foliage interest throughout the growing season. Like its parent, Acer campestre, Red Shine is tolerant of most soil types, although it does do best in rich, well drained soils. As with many of the long introduced trees, it is a tough contender and will tolerate drought, air pollution and soil compaction."
  • "Alnus cordata, known as the Italian Alder, is a fast growing pyramidal tree that sometimes holds onto it green glossy leaves as late as December in mild urban areas making it a very good screening tree. Introduced in the 1820s from Italy, it is very hardy and thrives on wet or dry soils after establishment. The vigour of Alnus cordata makes it unsuitable for paved areas near to buildings but it makes an excellent windbreak and screen for large open boundaries. Yellow catkins are produced in the spring and its leaves eventually turn yellow before they fall in the late autumn."
  • "Alnus glutinosa (Common Alder) is a medium sized tree which has a conical growth habit and produces yellow catkins in March. Its natural habitat is boggy land and river banks. However it is also very good for urban plantings as it thrives in all soils and tolerates air pollution. It is available as both multi-stemmed and as a single stem. Alnus glutinosa is a wonderful host to a wide range of wildlife. It is a very useful tree where the ground is liable to flood and can survive many weeks with its roots under water."
  • "Alnus incana (Grey Alder) is a hardy and tough medium tree, capable of coping with cold, wet soils and exposed situations. It is a fast grower, well suited to industrial areas and street plantings. Its pointed grey leaves readily distinguish it from Alnus glutinosa. Alnus incana was introduced from Europe in the 1780s and it does best on calcareous soils and tolerates air pollution."
  • "Carpinus betulus (Hornbeam) is wonderful in a parkland setting, growing in groups and is ideal for pleaching. It is a large tree with with a characteristic grey fluted trunk and ovate, ribbed and serrated leaves which turn a lovely clear yellow in autumn. It grows well on most soils, including clay and chalk. It is a useful tree for poor planting conditions and will do well as a street tree and in urban settings."
  • "Carpinus betulus Fastigiata is a medium sized tree of pyramidal habit. Slender in its youth it can often be seen growing in restricted areas despite the fact that it develops middle aged spread reaching up to 10m wide. It is better growing in an open parkland setting and it is very effective if left feathered to the base, producing gold and orange autumn colours. It grows well on most soils, including clay and chalk. It is well suited to poor planting conditions."
  • "Carpinus betulus Fastigiata Frans Fontaine is a far better proposition for planting in restricted areas than Carpinus betulus Fastigiata. It retains its columnar habit, being only 3m wide after 25 years. It tolerates pollution and soil compaction, making it an excellent street tree. It grows well on most soils, including clay and chalk. It is a tree well suited for urban settings and for poor planting conditions."
  • "Carpinus betulus Lucas (European Hornbeam) is notable for its narrow, columnar shape. Its green leaves with a sharp-toothed edge turn a bright yellow in the autumn and remain through the winter, adding some winter interest. In early spring, attractive yellow or green catkins form. It will grow in any soil type but Carpinus betulus Lucas does not do well in a very acid soil. It does best in a moist but well-drained situation. Once established it is reasonably drought-tolerant. It can be planted in sun, partial or full shade. Able to resist wind, it will do well in either an exposed or sheltered location, and because it is tolerant of pollution, the European Hornbeam is well-suited to use in an urban landscape. Carpinus betulus Lucas is also well-suited to container planting on a patio or rooftop terrace, grown either in a row to form a screen, or as a specimen plant for its tall, columnar shape. Because of the European Hornbeams resistance to pollution, and its narrow form, it is a good choice for an urban roadside planting."
  • "This vigorous semi evergreen plant is normally grown as a large shrub, but Cotoneaster watereri cornubia is also available as a standard tree. With a mature height of 6-8m, the branches are upright when young but are fast growing so soon become arching and graceful. It can be an excellent specimen or screening tree in a smaller garden. Year round interest is provided by rich green pointed leaves, clusters of small creamy-white flowers in June and masses of bright red berries in autumn which the birds will love. This variety is noted as being the best Cotoneaster for fruit, with the largest and most abundant of the species. During the autumn the leaves also develop hints of yellow and red autumn colour. Please note that this is only semi-evergreen in a sheltered location. Will do best in a well drained soils and planting in groups with similar species increases the production of fruit."
  • "Fagus sylvatica (Common Beech) is one of the most majestic of our trees and can become very large with its low branched habit. It has a wide range of uses in woodland, parkland and in broad verge plantings and few trees can surpass its rich, copper autumn foliage. Beech thrives just about anywhere other than exposed and coastal locations. As it is shallow rooted, under planting is not recommended. It does well in most reasonably fertile, well drained soils, except heavy clay or light sand. Tending to favour more temperate climates, Fagus sylvatica is difficult to establish when faced with extreme heat and drought. With this in mind avoid planting in paved or tarmac areas where reflected heat and light makes Beech suffer."
  • "Fagus sylvatica Atropurpurea (Purple Beech) is a superb tree for creating contrast in a parkland or large gardens as the darkness of the foliage draws the eye through the landscape. Being a cultivar, Fagus sylvatica Atropurpurea has a much deeper leaf and is a tree of great beauty and majesty. It makes a magnificent subject planted as a specimen in parks and large estates. Beech thrives just about anywhere other than exposed and coastal locations. As it is shallow rooted, under planting is not recommended. It does well in most reasonably fertile, well drained soil, except heavy clay or light sand."
  • "Fagus sylvativa Atropurpurea (Copper Beech) root ball hedging in ready formed hedging elements for an instant Impact. Our hedging elements are grown in the field rather than in troughs. This makes them more versatile and means they can be planted together to create a screening effect or alone as a specimen adding structure and form within an overall garden design."
  • "Fagus sylvatica (Common Beech) root ball hedging in ready formed hedging elements for an instant Impact. Our hedging elements are grown in the field rather than in troughs. This makes them more versatile and means they can be planted together to create a screening effect or alone as a specimen adding structure and form within an overall garden design."
  • "Prunus laurocerasus 'Novita' looks grand with its large, glossy foliage that stays put all year round. The glorious evergreen leaves are supplemented by scented white flowers that appear in spring. Later on, inedible, dark fruits appear. This is a particularly hardy evergreen laurel which makes a good hedging or screening plant, although the mature options we offer make a majestic specimen tree. Prunus laurocerasus 'Novita' is a vigorous tree, happiest in full sun or partial shade, but it can tolerate shade. Ideal for most soils except chalky."
  • "Grows from a shrub into a small to medium-size tree with a very dense branching and round crown to around 15 m but usually no more than about 10 m tall. The young twigs are conspicuously purple coloured which contrasts nicely with the dark green glossy leaf. The leaves are smaller and distinctly narrower than the species. This is the only way it differs from P. lusitanica. Thanks to the firm, leathery leaf, the tree is very wind resistant and can also tolerate sea wind. In 1893 it was described as a natural form (forma) of P. lusitanica. Suitable for use in parks and gardens, solitary or in groups. Needs protection against cold, drying wind."
  • "Pyrus calleryana Chanticleer is an extremely popular deciduous tree which is often planted for screening purposes. This pretty tree is the first to come into leaf in the spring, when its leaves emerge in conjunction with a pretty white flower which covers the tree. The foliage further emerges a bright and glossy green and remains on the tree until well into the autumn time, when it turns a bright orangey red before falling. Not only is Pyrus calleryana Chanticleer the first tree into leaf in the spring, it is the last tree to lose its leaves in the autumn time, a useful quality for screening. This callery pear has been known to produce very small fruits on occasion, however this should not cause concern as it is not a regular, or indeed impactful occurrence."
  • "Quercus ilex (Holm Oak) is a variety of evergreen oak, growing to approximately 20-25m in height. Its tolerance of many growing conditions and pollution make it a very versatile plant, often used in urban and coastal settings. Alternatively it can be used for hedging, windbreaks and topiary. Left to grow on its own, it will become a large, structural tree with a rounded crown. Catkins appear in the Spring, followed by small acorns which will mature the same year. The leaves of Quercus ilex are dark green and leathery with a whitish underside. Often the lower leaves are spiny, giving a resemblance to the Common Holly, which is also where the name comes from. It is thought that it may have developed this characteristic to prevent grazing by animals. Native to the Mediterranean region and is often found growing on its own or with Cedrus atlantica in the Moroccan Atlas mountains."
  • "Taxus baccata, known as English Yew, is a versatile evergreen native tree that is often grown as a hedge. Incredibly long lived, it is often associated with churchyard planting and rejuvenates itself remarkably well if pruned hard in the early spring. It is worth noting that every part of Yew is poisonous, apart from the red flesh of the berry female plants produce, to humans and animals. It is a common misconception that the entire berry is poisonous however, that said, we would still not advise you to eat them! Like most evergreens it is not tolerant of waterlogged soils and thrives best on free draining lighter land."
  • Taxus baccata Fastigiata is a fastigiate or upright, slow-growing conifer with attractive, yellow tinted, evergreen foliage. Taxus baccata fastigiata has a fairly narrow width and columnar shape, making it ideal to use as sentries outside front doors and along pathways or to punctuate a border. This striking conifer is easy to maintain and stray stems can be trimmed back to maintain the symmetrical appearance. The foliage is highly toxic so take care around animals. Irish Yew is expected to reach a height and spread of 5 x 4 meters in 20 years, and will grow well in any situation, tolerating all soils, other than damp, badly drained conditions.

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